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    1. What references are available to explain how the End of Life Cycle for Air Force equipment and materiel should be managed? 2. What basic issues must be considered when evaluating if AF System "End of Life Cycle" is being managed correctly? AF parts include (AF Communications parts that have NSNs and non-stock listed items): COTs parts AF NSNs (ERRC N's, U's, S's, T's and F's) items Crypto Items Secure IA parts 2. If a contractor is managing the "End of Life Cycle" of a system, what is needed in the contract to get the assigned contractor to manage AF system "End of Life Cycle?" 3. Should regulations in the contract be referenced via a CLIN? 4. Where can I find a AF system "End of Life Cycle?" plan template? I am in dire need of one. 5. BTW..is the "End of Life Cycle Plan" for an AF System required as in Regulatory, Mandatory or Statutory? Please respond NLT COB Friday, 7 March 2014. If deadline passes, please send as soonest. Regards, Martha A. Schiller AFNWC/NCSM/NC3 DSN 263-1991 (505) 853-1991


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    Question Title: AF System End of Life Cycle Plan questions and template
     
    AF parts include (AF Communications parts that have NSNs and non-stock listed items): COTs parts AF NSNs (ERRC N's, U's, S's, T's and F's) items Crypto Items Secure IA parts
     
    Questions:
     
    1. What references are available to explain how the End of Life Cycle for Air Force equipment and materiel should be managed?
     
    A. Interim DoD 5000.02 https://acc.dau.mil/CommunityBrowser.aspx?id=688860
    “2. Disposal.  At the end of its useful life, a system will be demilitarized and
    disposed of in accordance with all legal and regulatory requirements and policy relating to safety
    (including explosives safety), security, and the environment. [page 29]
     
    a.  Programmatic ESOH Evaluation (PESHE).  The Program Manager, regardless of
    acquisition category (ACAT) level, will prepare and maintain a PESHE to document data generated by ESOH analyses conducted in support of program execution. The PESHE will include at a minimum identification of ESOH risks and their status; and, identification of hazardous materials, wastes, and pollutants (discharges/emissions/noise) associated with the
    system and its support as well as the plans for minimization and/or safe disposal. [page 86 Enclosure 3]
     
    (6) Develop complete resource estimates for T&E to include: test articles, test sites and
    instrumentation, test support equipment, threat representations and simulations, test targets and expendables, support for operational forces used in test (both friendly and threat), models and simulations, test beds, joint mission environment, distributed test networks, funding, manpower and personnel, training, federal/state/local requirements, range requirements, and any special requirements (e.g., explosive ordnance disposal requirements or corrosion prevention and control). Resources will reflect the best estimate for conducting all test activities. Resources will be mapped against the evaluation framework and schedule to ensure adequacy and availability. [page 93 Enclosure 4]
     
    (6) Begin demilitarization and disposal planning of system, subsystems, or components,
    with sufficient lead time before the disposal or retirement of the first asset to reduce costs and
    risks and to ensure compliance with statutory and regulatory requirements. [page  110 Enclosure 6]
     
    (5) After Initial Operational Capability (IOC), the LCSP is the principle document
    governing the system’s sustainment. Programs will update the plan whenever there are changes to the product support strategy, or every 5 years, whichever occurs first, supported by appropriate analyses, sustainment metrics, sustainment costs, system components or configuration (hardware and software), environmental requirements, and disposal plans or costs. [page 111 Enclosure 6]
     
    (a) Termination: Demilitarization or Disposal. The system will be demilitarized and
    disposed of in accordance with all legal and regulatory requirements and policy related to safety
    (including explosive safety) and the environment. The recommendation will be coordinated with
    the DoD Component or, for JUONS and JEONS, the Combatant Commands. [page 147 Enclosure 13]
     
    B. DAU ACQuipedia article on Life Cycle Sustainment Plan (LCSP) ADDM Template v 1.3 located at: https://acc.dau.mil/CommunityBrowser.aspx?id=655910  
    The following LCSP Template is courtesy of the Air Force, provided from the Air Force Acquisition Document Development & Management (ADDM) System, which is a restricted DoD site. Please note that this is an Air Force Template provided for your guidance, and that the other services or agencies may have different documentation requirements.  This document is current as of 15 Jan 2013.
    The Life-Cycle Sustainment Plan (LCSP) is the program’s primary management tool to satisfy the Warfighter’s sustainment requirements through the delivery of a product support package. Development of a life-cycle product support strategy and plan are critical steps in the delivery of the product support package. To access the ADDM: https://www.aekm.wpafb.af.mil/Addm/Login/index.jsf
    Guidance: The following annexes must be included:
    • Product Support Business Case Analysis (DODI 5000.02)
    • Logistics Assessment and Corrective Action Plan (DODI 5000.02)
    • System Disposal Plan (DODI 5000.02; DOD 4160.21-M)
    • Preservation and Storage of Unique Tooling (DODI 5000.02)
    • Core Logistics Analysis (DODI 5000.02)
    • Source of Repair Analysis (DODI 5000.02)
    • Service-Specific Requirements, including detailed system Product Support Plan/integrated product support elements)
    • T&E Planning (not required in all LCSP’s see template instructions)
    .
    C. AFI63-101/20-101 07 MARCH 2013 https://acc.dau.mil/CommunityBrowser.aspx?id=393791
    2.2. Service Acquisition Executive (SAE) will: Component Acquisition Executives (also called Service Acquisition Executives (SAEs) and referred to in this document as the SAE) are Secretaries of the Military Departments with the power of redelegation. In the Air Force, the official delegated as the SAE is SAF/AQ. The SAE is responsible for all acquisition functions within the Air Force.
     
    2.2.1. Execute SAE responsibilities outlined in DoD guidance for execution of AF acquisitions. The SAE is responsible for the integrated life cycle management of systems and services programs from entry into the defense acquisition management system to system retirement and disposal. This includes research, development, test, evaluation, production, and delivery of new systems, or modifications and support of existing systems. For ACAT ID or IAM programs, management responsibility flows directly, without intervention, from the MDA to the SAE to the PEO to the PM. For all other programs, management responsibility flows directly, without intervention, from the MDA to the PEO to the PM.
     
    6.20. Demilitarization, Disposal, Reclamation, and Migration. Migration planning shall be an integral part of system life cycle planning as an element in the inventory management of AF assets. Demilitarization, reclamation, and disposal guidance is contained in DoD 4160.28-M, Defense Demilitarization, and AFMAN 23-110, Volume 6. For air and space programs also refer to AFPD 16-4, Accounting for Units, Installations and Aerospace Vehicles and AFI 16-402, Aerospace Vehicle Programming, Assignment, Distribution, Accounting, and Termination. For Nuclear Weapon Related Materiel refer to AFI 20-110, Nuclear Weapons-Related Materiel Management.
     
    6.20.1. Demilitarization Plans. DEMIL planning early in the development of a system is important to reduce the risks of inadvertent release of military property. DEMIL requirements for items such as prototypes and tooling, end items, and each NSN must be documented, as well as how to procedures for demilitarizing the items. DoD 4160.28-M provides guidance for programmatic and procedural plans. DEMIL plans shall be documented when prototypes are delivered. The PM shall ensure demilitarization and disposal of end items are addressed in the program budget.
     
    6.20.1.1. Demilitarization (DEMIL) Code Determination/Procedures and Execution of DEMIL Plans. Demilitarization code determination must be performed as soon as material designs are documented.
     
    6.20.1.2. Programmatic Plans shall include the process (e.g. technical orders, Configuration Control Board, etc) to ensure program changes such as technology insertion, block upgrades, and approved engineering changes are captured and included in the procedural plan..
     
    6.20.1.3. For aircraft programs, the PM shall develop a migration plan addressing reclamation and disposal for each mission design series (MDS), to include peculiar end items associated with the MDS. For system not designated as MDS, the plan shall address migration to the system or end item level as appropriate.
     
    6.20.1.4. The PM documents an assessment of when the initial AFI 16-402 Migration Plan is due. The migration plan shall then be documented and periodically reviewed. Generally, this would be when retirements of the system are scheduled in the Future Years Defense Program (FYDP).
    6.20.2. PMs shall ensure demilitarization, disposal, reclamation support requirements are identified in accordance with applicable directives NLT MS C. Funding must be forecasted well enough in advance to support execution of these activities throughout each weapon system’s life cycle.
     
    6.20.3. All PMs shall dispose of IT Hardware Assets IAW AFI 33-112, Information Technology Hardware Asset Management and Software Assets and AFI 33-114, Software Management.”
     
    D. DoDM- 4160.28-M-V1 https://acc.dau.mil/CommunityBrowser.aspx?id=521685
     
    “a.  DEMIL planning early in the development of military systems is required by Reference (c) and is an important activity to reduce the risks of inadvertent release of DoD personal property.  The earlier in the development cycle that materiel is released, the greater the potential for replication and countermeasures to be developed.  DEMIL planning is not independent of other programmatic planning activities and as such must leverage from, as well as contribute to, other activities.
     
    b.  DEMIL plans will vary depending on the operational, logistic, and technical aspects of the system being addressed.  DAPMs must tailor their plans based on the phase of the program and their strategies for DoD personal property disposition processing.
     
    c. The DEMIL plan is intended to address the challenges that can arise when personnel who do not have detailed knowledge of a system and its material content, hazards, and specific DEMIL and TSC requirements, must process the material for DEMIL, TSC, and disposal.  This is especially important when older systems, for which system DAPMs may no longer be assigned and personnel with system knowledge are no longer available, are declared excess.
     
    d.  A DEMIL plan shall be generated for all defense acquisition programs prior to developmental test and evaluation and before release of any new system or item to a non-military activity.  Additionally, a DEMIL plan shall be generated when any major modification or upgrade to an existing defense system or item is made.”
     
    DFARS 252.245-7004, Demilitarization, mutilation, and destruction. http://www.law.cornell.edu/cfr/text/48/252.245-7004
    “If demilitarization, mutilation, or destruction of contractor inventory is required, the Contractor shall demilitarize, mutilate, or destroy contractor inventory, in accordance with the terms and conditions of the contract and consistent with Defense Demilitarization Manual, DoDM 4160.28-M, edition in effect as of the date of this contract.”
     
    2. What basic issues must be considered when evaluating if AF System "End of Life Cycle" is being managed correctly?
    The following should be taken into consideration when planning correctly for “End of Life Cycle”
    ·  Age of the system
    ·  Cost of maintenance (including personnel costs)
    ·  Spare parts availability/obsolescence issues
    ·  Packaging, Handling, Storage and Transportation (PHS&T
    ·  Technical Data/data rights
    ·  Environmental, Safety and Occupational Health (ESOH)
    ·  Disposition of hazardous materials and precious metals
    ·  Transfer to another Service, OGA, Industry
    ·  Donation to a museum
     
    Contact DLA Disposition Services for more info at http://www.dispositionservices.dal.mil/
     
    3. If a contractor is managing the "End of Life Cycle" of a system, what is needed in the contract to get the assigned contractor to manage AF system "End of Life Cycle?"
    ·  Pertinent FAR/DFAR regulations should be location in the H or I Clause of the contract
    ·  References to DoD Policy/guidance/instructions can be written into Section C (SOW) of the contract with the associated wording “provided as guidance only”. 
    ·  Any deliverables would need associated CDRLs and DIDs created (see the following for DID access: https://assist.dla.mil/online/start/ )
     
    4. Should regulations in the contract be referenced via a CLIN?
    Regulations would be referenced in the H or I Clauses of the Contract.  A separate CLIN could be created for visibility to the funding, or deferred funding, and associated effort of the Disposal Plan development/implementation under the current contract.
     
    5. Where can I find a AF system "End of Life Cycle?" plan template? I am in dire need of one.
    I will get back to you if I can get a copy of an Air Force example.  For a Disposal Plan template go to:
    https://acc.dau.mil/CommunityBrowser.aspx?id=246998
     
    6. BTW..is the "End of Life Cycle Plan" for an AF System required as in Regulatory, Mandatory or Statutory?
    I can only find the required in DoD policy, guidance and instructions (including AF references quoted above)
     
    See more on Disposal from a related AAP question and ACQuipeidia article: https://dap.dau.mil/aap/pages/qdetails.aspx?cgiSubjectAreaID=7&cgiQuestionID=116159 ; https://dap.dau.mil/acquipedia/Pages/ArticleDetails.aspx?aid=1e8209f5-1581-4987-827a-3ecf299383a3


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