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    I've researched OPM Occupational Series and can't find anything referencing an 1105; I know about 15 years or so this series was done away with. Is there some where I can go to research if this in fact is still a Series that falls in the Acquisition Arena; if so can they be warranted just as those in the 1102 Series.


    Answer

    I recommend that you go to the following website to get more information on the training and certification requirements of 1105’s : https://dap.dau.mil/career/pur/Pages/Default.aspx

    I also recommend that you go to the Workforce and Human Capital Initiatives Website  to find the statistics which I'm providing below.
    https://dap.dau.mil/workforce/Pages/Default.aspx

    As of 1 Oct 2013, there were 1,283 Purchasing Agents (1105’s) in DoD.  357 are in the Army, 501 are in the Navy, 97 are in the Air Force, and 328 are in other Defense Agencies.  The numbers have been dwindling since 2001 when we had 4,121 1105’s in the workplace.  (I cannot find any numbers before 2001)


    I have included the Position Classification Standard for 1105’s which outlines the duties and skills required for individuals in the Purchasing Series at https://acc.dau.mil/CommunityBrowser.aspx?id=701838.  It specifically discusses “signatory authority” .  Yes, 1105’s can be warranted.


    Signatory Authority

    Contracting officers are individuals who have the authority to enter into and administer contracts. With respect to small purchases, this authority may not exceed the small purchase dollar threshold. With respect to delivery orders, this authority may not exceed dollar limitations established in the contract. The authority is defined in "warrants" or other instruments of delegation. The warrant typically identifies the dollar threshold and any other limits on the individual's authority. Contracting officers receive advice from specialists in engineering, supply, finance, law, or other functions. They remain, however, responsible and accountable for the purchases made, and they decide whether to confer with personnel in these other offices.

    The fact that an employee has signatory authority does not, by itself, mean that the grade of the employee's position should be increased automatically. It is other factors that usually accompany signatory authority, such as increased responsibility, scope, and impact that may affect grade. The grade of a particular position, therefore, must be evaluated in terms of all of the factor levels, and must include consideration of the effect of any limits on signatory authority



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