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Serialized Item Management (SIM)

DAU GLOSSARY DEFINITION

Alternate Definition

Programs and techniques that use Life-cycle Item Management (LCIM) data to track the performance of uniquely identified items throughout their life cycle. The overarching goal of these programs and techniques is to enable managers achieve optimum weapon system materiel availability at the best total ownership cost through use of effective and efficient life-cycle management practices. 

Alternate Definition Source
General Information

SIM encompasses programs and techniques that use LCIM data to track the performance of uniquely identified items throughout their life cycle. The overarching goal of these programs and techniques is to enable managers achieve optimum weapon system materiel availability at the best total ownership cost through use of effective and efficient life-cycle management practices. SIM is enabled by item unique identification (IUID), automated identification technology (AIT), and automated information systems (AISs)

Related to IUID and RFID practices, which are used to mark items with unique identifiers (former) and identify items using radio waves (latter), SIM is a practice designed to manage materiel throughout its lifecycle using automated identification technology (AIT) and automated information systems (AISs) to generate and process Life-cycle Item Management (LCIM) data.

SIM facilitates the management of populations of select items and relies on Unique Item Identifiers.  SIM categories include:

  1. Items that require periodic test, calibration, or safety inspection.
  2. Depot level repairables.
  3. Other repairable items, down to and including, sub-component repairables.
  4. High-cost and high-demand non-repairable items.
  5. Life-limited, time-controlled, and critical items.
  6. Items under warranty.
  7. Items susceptible to counterfeiting.
  8. Items that require technical directive tracking.
  9. Items with a Classified, Sensitive, or Pilferable Controlled Inventory item code.
  10. Items requiring an accountable property record, including government-furnished property and materiel.
  11. Items requiring intensive visibility and management.
  12. Other items that are serially managed, as determined by the requiring activity

 

Once categorized, life-cycle events for the items are defined and captured to build in traceability of the item, such as who has had it, where and how has it operated and for how long, and what has been done to sustain it, using automated capture techniques as much as possible.

As a mechanism for generating LCIM data, SIM data can be useful in providing items’ life histories, weapons’ systems functional performance, support for CBM+ efforts, and overall item control and accountability. 

SIM enablers include the military departments, commercial entities, and those responsible for acquisition and sustainment activities within DoD.  Compatibility and interoperability of SIM processes across all areas supported by an integrated enterprise architecture that evolves to capture the latest SIM-enabling technologies for DoD supported items is essential for SIM to succeed. 

See also Data Standards  on the ASD(A) Defense Pricing and Contracting site for additional references and information.

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