U.S. flag

An official website of the United States government

Dot gov

Official websites use .gov
A .gov website belongs to an official government organization in the United States.

Https

Secure .gov websites use HTTPS
A lock () or https:// means you’ve safely connected to the .gov website. Share sensitive information only on official, secure websites.

Breadcrumb

  1. Home
  2. Blogs
  3. From The Chairman and Executive Editor - Issue 95

From the Chairman and Executive Editor - Issue 95

The theme for this issue is “Learning While Doing,” an appropriate premise given that now in the era of COVID-19, many of us are getting on-the-job training in how to effectively work remotely from…

From the Chairman and Executive Editor - Issue 95

From the Chairman and Executive Editor - Issue 95
Image removed.The theme for this issue is “Learning While Doing,” an appropriate premise given that now in the era of COVID-19, many of us are getting on-the-job training in how to effectively work remotely from our teammates and organizations.

The first article, “Technology Trust: System Information Impact on Autonomous Systems Adoption in High-Risk Applications” by Michael G. Anderson and Johnathan C. Mun, addresses one of the more important issues in adopting autonomous systems in the military: how and when to deploy such technology, even as the systems become more capable. The use and adoption of an autonomous technology to replace people depends on both the system capability to perform the task, and the trust (based on experience) that it will do so. The development of experience-based trust in autonomous systems is costly and carries a high risk of harm to operators. This article examines a methodology for technology discovery that reduces the need for experience-based trust and contributes to increased adoption of autonomous systems.

The second article by Matthew R. Markman, Jonathan D. Ritschel, and Edward D. White, titled “Use of Factors in Development Estimates: Improving the Cost Analyst Toolkit,” reports on research that expands the currently available toolkit for cost analysts, through the development of cost factors in the Engineering and Manufacturing Development (EMD) phase of the life cycle. The authors provide guidance on where cost analysts’ efforts should be allocated, using factor creation and statistical testing in areas such as program management, systems engineering, data, and training.

The third article is “A Learning Curve Model Accounting for the Flattening Effect in Production Cycles” by Evan R. Boone, John J. Elshaw, Clay M. Koschnick, Jonathan D. Ritschel, and Adedeji B. Badiru. It describes the creation of a new learning curve for production processes that incorporates a new model parameter, that of the “flattening effect” later in the production process, i.e., a decreasing learning rate function over time, as opposed to a constant learning rate that is frequently used. The new parameter allows for a steeper learning curve at the beginning of production, and a flattening effect near the end of production. This model showed a statistically significant reduction in error when compared to Wright’s learning curve, which is a popular method used by many organizations today.

The Research Agenda has been expanded to include cybersecurity and cyberanalytics.

This issue’s Current Research Resources in Defense Acquisition focuses on Mid-Tier Acquisition.

The featured work in the Defense Acquisition Reading List book review is The Story of Technology: How We Got Here and What the Future Holds by Daniel Gerstein, reviewed by Janel C. Wallace.

Dr. Craig Arndt has left the Editorial Board. We thank him for his service.

We welcome Mr. David Lewis to the Editorial Board.

Dr. Larrie D. Ferreiro
Chairman and Executive Editor
Defense ARJ